May is Mental Health Awareness Month - #WhyCare?

Each year millions of Americans face the reality of living with a mental illness. During May, join Team HMC in helping NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) raise awareness around mental health.


Each year, the movement grows stronger. Raising awareness on your own, as part of a small group or part of your community can make a difference. Taking action and raising awareness of mental health conditions can break down obstacles and improve the chance of recovery. Learn how you can make a difference in your community and for millions of Americans across the U.S.



The WhyCare? campaign is an opportunity to share the importance of care in our relationships to others, in mental health treatment and services and in support and education to millions of people, families, caregivers and loved ones affected by mental illness. Demonstrating how and why we care brings more to awareness by showing our actions and connections to others. Care has the power to make a life-changing impact on those affected by mental health conditions.


Mental Health Facts

  • 1 in 5 (46.6 million) adults in the United States experience a mental health condition in a given year.

  • 1 in 25 (11.2 million) adults in the United States experience a serious mental illness in a given year.

  • Approximately 46.6 million adults in the United States face the reality of managing a mental illness every day.

  • Half of all lifetime mental health conditions begin by age 14 and 75% by age 24, but early intervention programs can help.

  • Up to 90% of those who die by suicide have an underlying mental illness as revealed by psychological autopsy. 46% of those who die by suicide have a diagnosed mental illness.

  • Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. With effective care, suicidal thoughts are treatable, and suicide is preventable.

  • Individuals with mental health conditions face an average 11-year delay between experiencing symptoms and starting treatment.

  • Common barriers to treatment include the cost of mental health care and insurance, prejudice and discrimination, and structural barriers like transportation.

  • Even though most people can experience relief from symptoms and support for their recovery in treatment, less than half of the adults in the United States get the help they need.


What Is Stigma?

People experiencing mental health conditions often face rejection, bullying and even discrimination. This can make their journey to recovery longer and more difficult. Stigma is when someone, or you yourself, views you in a negative way because you have a mental health condition. Some people describe stigma as shame that can be felt as a judgement from someone else or a feeling that is internal, something that confuses feeling bad with being bad.


Navigating life with a mental health condition can be tough, and the isolation, blame and secrecy that is often encouraged by stigma can create huge challenges to reaching out, getting needed support and living well. Learning how to cope with stigma and how to avoid and address stigma are important for all of us.


Take the stigmafree Pledge

Mental health matters to everyone. Individuals, companies, organizations and others can all take the pledge to learn more about mental illness, to see a person for who they are and take action on mental health issues. Take the pledge and raise awareness.

  • Learn about mental health—educate myself and others

  • See the person not the illness—strive to listen, understand, tell my own story

  • Take action—spread the word, raise awareness, make a difference

TAKE THE PLEDGE

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